SC Texting and Driving Law In Full Force

SC Texting and Driving Law

Warning Period of SC Texting and Driving Law is Over

SC Texting and Driving LawThis past June, South Carolina lawmakers passed a bill banning texting and driving. To inform drivers that the practice is now illegal, law enforcement spent several months pulling drivers over and issuing warnings about typing on a mobile phone or tablet while driving a moving vehicle. Now, however, the grace period has ended and the SC texting and driving law is in full effect.

Reportedly, police have issued 278 warnings about SC texting and driving laws in the last 6 months.

The first time an officer catches a driver texting and driving, the fine will be $25. Subsequent offenses will lead to a $50 fine. No points will be taken off the driver’s license for texting and driving. Many safety advocates want tougher anti-texting and driving laws in the state.

“I think it’s a good first step, but everything needs to be modified. I think $25 is nothing, that’s like going to McDonald’s with your family,” said Mark Conley, the owner of Beach Driving School, LLC. Many states that ban texting and driving fine drivers $100-$200 and remove points from the driver’s license.

The Centers for Disease Control state that 9 people are killed every day in the US because of a distracted driver, and the South Carolina Department of Public Safety says that 46 people have already been killed as a result of distracted driving in 2014 in South Carolina alone. While many things can distract drivers, such as talking on the phone or changing a radio station, texting and driving is becoming one of the most common offenses, despite legislation in most states that makes the practice illegal.

Camden, SC passed one of the first SC texting and driving laws in the state. City of Camden Police Chief Joe Floyd says that the ordinance helped cut down on traffic accidents in the city.

“What we saw was a tremendous change, as far as compliance with our statute,” Floyd said. “We’ve been very happy with the effects of it.”

Distracted Driving, Including Texting and Driving, in South Carolina

Distracted driving includes:

  • talking on a cell phone
  • eating and drinking
  • grooming or putting on makeup
  • reading books, newspapers, or even a map
  • using a PDA or navigation system
  • playing with the radio, a CD or an iPod
  • texting or writing emails
  • checking social media

It’s a common occurrence to see distracted driving while cruising down South Carolina roads and interstates.  Whether the distraction is eating, putting on makeup, talking on a cellphone, or even just daydreaming, the effects of distracted driving can lead to an accident, resulting in life altering and even deadly consequences.

The Strom Law Firm Helps Those Injured by Distracted Drivers, Including Texting and Driving

If you have been injured by a distracted driver, the South Carolina accident attorneys at the Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. will fight for fair compensation for your injuries. Our South Carolina car accident lawyers are prepared to fight for compensation in the courtroom and will defend your right to compensation for your past and future medical bills, lost wages and future earnings, your pain and suffering, and, in the event of a fatal car accident, even wrongful death. Our attorneys offer free, confidential consultations to discuss the facts of your personal injury case for distracted driving, so contact us today. 803.252.4800.

People Understand Dangers of Texting and Driving, Do It Anyway

danger of texting and driving

Study Shows Drivers Understand Danger of Texting and Driving but Chooses to do it Anyway

danger of texting and drivingA new survey shows that 98% of drivers understand the dangers of texting and driving – statistically, it just as dangerous as drinking and driving – but those drivers chose to text and drive regardless of the increased risk of injury or death.

Three-quarters of the people surveyed said they chose texting and driving regardless of the laws or dangers of texting and driving. Many states have passed legislation to ban texting and driving, as well as checking social media or email on a smartphone. Two-thirds of those surveyed said they read text messages while stopped at a stop sign or red light, and over one-quarter said they sent texts while driving.

Over one-quarter of the drivers in the texting and driving survey said they believed they “can easily do several things at once, even while driving.”

The study was conducted by AT&T, as part of their larger anti-texting and driving campaign. The phone company designed the survey with help from David Greenfield, founder of the Center for Internet and Technology Addiction, who is also a professor at the University of Connecticut’s School of Medicine.

“We compulsively check our phones because every time we get an update through text, email or social media, we experience an elevation of dopamine, which is a neurochemical in the brain that makes us feel happy,” said Dr. Greenfield. “If that desire for a dopamine fix leads us to check our phones while we’re driving, a simple text can turn deadly.”

AT&T is offering a free app for smartphones that will silence text and other message alerts while the phone owner is driving, to help prevent the temptation to text and drive.

The survey asked more specific questions about why drivers were texting and driving. They found that 28% said they were afraid they would miss out on something important if they did not immediately answer the message; ¼ believed that their driving was not impaired by reading or responding to texts; also ¼ of respondents felt pressure to respond right away because it was expected of them; 6% said they thought they might be addicted to texting; 14% admitted they became anxious if they did not respond to a message right away; and 17% said they felt a “sense of satisfaction” when they can read and respond to a text message.

Texting and driving has surfaced as one of the leading causes of death among teenagers and young adults, higher even than drunk driving. The distracted driving practice also has as high a mortality rate for the general population as drunk driving, according to studies. South Carolina recently passed texting and driving legislation, making it the last Southern state to do so.

The Strom Law Firm Helps Those Injured by Distracted Drivers, Including Texting and Driving

If you have been injured by a distracted driver, the South Carolina accident attorneys at the Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. will fight for fair compensation for your injuries. Our South Carolina Distracted Driving Accident Lawyers are prepared to fight for compensation in the courtroom and will defend your right to compensation for your past and future medical bills, lost wages and future earnings, your pain and suffering, and, in the event of a fatal car accident, even wrongful death. Our attorneys offer free, confidential consultations to discuss the facts of your personal injury case caused by distracted driving, so contact us today. 803.252.4800.

Trucking Companies Must Help Stop Distracted Driving

distracted driving

Distracted Driving is a Huge Safety Problem for Trucking Companies

distracted drivingDistracted driving is becoming one of the biggest road safety hazards in the United States. Numerous studies have shown that modern technology poses a huge temptation to drivers – hands-free phones, smart watches or other wearable tech, Bluetooth headsets, and even simple texting and driving. One study, conducted by AT&T, showed that three-quarters of drivers chose to text and drive, regardless of the dangers. Another recent study showed that distracted driving, especially texting and driving, is just as deadly as driving under the influence (DUI).

But too many drivers succumb to the temptation, including truck drivers – and that becomes a liability for trucking companies.

“What we don’t want is that truck driver holding that phone up to his ear,” said Michael J. Riley, president of the Motor Transport Association of CT. “That’s distracted driving. That’s dangerous.”

Trucking companies are some of the most vocal advocates for tougher distracted driving laws. Currently, each state varies in its laws and penalties, although most states now have laws against texting and driving.

“We have a lot of stake here,” said Riley. “There’s a moral commitment to doing things safely, there’s an economic component to it all, and we’re proud of what we do and we don’t want to do it in a way that jeopardizes anybody’s safety.”

Enforcement of distracted driving laws can be difficult, due to the prevalence of the harmful practice. One way that states combat the problem is to set up checkpoints, cameras, and police cruisers to catch those breaking the law, especially truck drivers.

“There are studies that say the more proactive we are about enforcing it, the greater it does reduce it,” said Lt. Donald Bridge, a Connecticut DMV Inspector. “The trucks provide a higher platform for the driver so it’s harder to see in there, so we have to take vantage points where we’re up above that and looking down into the cabs.”

“As traffic approaches, we’re looking at everything,” Sgt. Aaron Reimer of the Ohio State Patrol said.

However, Sgt. Reimer says there’s a larger problem with issuing tickets: “The drivers aren’t taking it seriously enough.”

Federal law says that talking on a cell phone is illegal for truck drivers, because it not only causes distracted driving, but the driver takes one hand off the wheel, which means he or she could lose control of the truck. However, because federal law is so strict against truck drivers, thousands of distracted driving accidents involving commercial trucks are actually caused by the other driver.

“Two-thirds of accidents involving commercial vehicles are actually caused by a vehicle other than the commercial vehicle,” Bill Graves with the American Trucking Association said. In Ohio in 2013, there were 10,000 commercial trucks on the roads, and 2,000 distracted driving accidents involving the trucks.

Still, distracted driving catches up to truck drivers too often. “We found that truck drivers are 23 times more likely to be involved in one of these safety critical events compared to when they weren’t texting,” said Jeff Hickman, a researcher with Virginia Tech Transportation Institute.

Trucking Accidents Can Cause Serious Injury and Wrongful Death

If you or a loved one has been such a victim, contact the Strom Law Firm, LLC South Carolina trucking accident lawyers. Whether you were injured in a bus accident, tractor trailer accident, or any other commercial vehicle accident, we can help. Contact us today at 803.252.4800.

Texting and Driving Campaign “#X” Goes Viral

One Day After Premiere, Texting and Driving Campaign “Just Text #X” Goes Viral

texting and driving campaignTexting and driving has surfaced as one of the leading causes of death among teenagers and young adults, higher even than drunk driving. The mortality rate for distracted driving in general is as high as the mortality rate for drunk driving for the general population.

The latest research study, published in the August edition of the journal, analyzed traffic data over an 11 year period, and looked closely at traffic patterns and car accident data in which police officers specifically stopped drivers for texting and driving (called primary enforcement laws). The study also looked into the effectiveness of other texting and driving laws, which ban the practice, but allow police to issue tickets only if texting and driving also impacts other traffic laws.

Currently, 45 states ban texting and driving, with 39 of those using primary enforcement – more than the 33 that allow police to pull drivers over for not wearing a seat belt. South Carolina recently passed texting and driving legislation, making it the last Southern state to do so.

There are approximately 3,300 fatalities related to distracted driving car accidents each year in the United States. The CDC reports that 31% of 18-64 year old drivers in the US admit to having sent a text while operating a vehicle in the past 30 days.

These statistics are terrifying. Too many drivers, despite local laws, believe that they can multitask – driving while fiddling with the radio or GPS, talking on the phone, or worst yet, texting and driving.

A new texting and driving campaign, in partnership with AT&T’s long-running “It Can Wait” campaign, has launched and in just 24 hours, gone viral. “#X” is a hashtag that texting and driving campaign creators encourage anyone to send to their conversation partner in order to quickly pause the conversation while they drive. Pop culture stars like Tim McGraw and Demi Lovato teamed up with AT&T’s latest incarnation of the “It Can Wait” campaign to promote #X on social media as well as a video.

So far, the program has received 5 million pledges from people pledging to avoid texting and driving.

Meanwhile, a branch of the texting and driving campaign created “The Great American Rivalry Series #X Battle” focusing on high school students, who not only are just learning to drive, but many of whom own their first cell or smart phones. The battle encourages students to tweet #X and their school’s hashtag, and the school with the most “noise” from tweets will win. So far, the #X texting and driving campaign racked up 1.37 million tweets for the battle alone.

The Strom Law Firm Helps Those Injured by Distracted Drivers, Including Texting and Driving

If you have been injured by a distracted driver, the South Carolina accident attorneys at the Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. will fight for fair compensation for your injuries. Our South Carolina car accident lawyers are prepared to fight for compensation in the courtroom and will defend your right to compensation for your past and future medical bills, lost wages and future earnings, your pain and suffering, and, in the event of a fatal car accident, even wrongful death. Our attorneys offer free, confidential consultations to discuss the facts of your personal injury case for distracted driving, so contact us today. 803.252.4800.

Updates to Distracted Driving Laws Could Lead to Cell Phone Ban

distracted driving law

San Antonio Lawmaker Seeks to Ban Cell Phones in Distracted Driving Law

distracted driving lawA lawmaker in San Antonio has proposed updates to local distracted driving laws that would mean drivers cannot not use cell phones at all while in their vehicles.

Mike Gallagher, from District 10, proposed a revision to San Antonio’s local distracted driving law, which was passed in 2010. The ban currently prohibits use of any handheld mobile devices while driving, except for dialing phone numbers and talking on the phone. Gallagher’s latest proposal would ban even talking on a cell phone, because it can cause distractions while on the road.

“The main thing has to do with hand-held devices. In other words, if you’re driving down the road, if you can talk to somebody without using hand-held devices you’re fine, but it’s those people that are holding something in their hands,” said Gallagher.

“While the city took a step in the right direction with the distracted driving ordinance, I believe there is more we can do to improve public safety and reduce the distracted driving hazard,” Gallagher said.  “That is why I have requested that city staff examine the current ordinance related to the ban on the use of hand held mobile communication devices and add a provision stating that they may only be used in a ‘hands free capacity, unless in an emergency situation.”

“Remember, driving is not a right, it is a privilege,” Gallagher said.  “We owe it to other drivers on the road and ourselves to operate a vehicle in the safest manner.”

Texting and driving, if not other forms of distracted driving, has surfaced as one of the leading causes of death among teenagers and young adults, higher even than drunk driving. The distracted driving practice also has as high a mortality rate for the general population as drunk driving, according to studies. South Carolina recently passed texting and driving legislation, making it the last Southern state to do so. However, the state allows drivers to talk on their cell phones, use GPS, and change radio stations, which are all activities that can cause distracted driving accidents.

Distracted Driving in South Carolina

Distracted driving includes:

  • texting and driving
  • talking on or playing with a cell phone
  • eating or drinking
  • talking to passengers
  • grooming or putting on makeup
  • reading books, newspapers, or even a map
  • using a PDA or navigation system
  • watching a video or playing on a computer or tablet
  • playing with the radio, a CD or an iPod

It’s a common occurrence to see distracted drivers cruising down South Carolina roads and interstates.  Whether the distraction is eating, putting on makeup, talking on a cellphone, or even just daydreaming, the effects of a South Carolina distracted driving accident can result in life altering and even deadly consequences.

The Strom Law Firm Helps Those Injured by Distracted Drivers

If you have been injured by a distracted driver, the South Carolina distracted driving accident attorneys at the Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. will fight for fair compensation for your injuries. Our South Carolina car accident lawyers are prepared to fight for compensation in the courtroom and will defend your right to compensation for your past and future medical bills, lost wages and future earnings, your pain and suffering, and, in the event of a fatal car accident, even wrongful death. Our attorneys offer free, confidential consultations to discuss the facts of your personal injury case for distracted driving, so contact us today. 803.252.4800.

Parents Are Largest Cause of Teens’ Distracted Driving

distracted driving

Teenage Distracted Driving is a Problem Parents Contribute To

distracted drivingTeenagers are one of the largest problem groups when it comes to distracted driving, especially from talking on the phone or texting and driving. However, a new study shows that the cause of a teen’s distracted driving is, more than half the time, due to an interruption from their parents.

Parents call their children while the teenagers are driving, the study shows, and 53% of teenagers involved in the study of 408 teens said they answered the phone if a parent was calling them.

The American Psychological Association presented the study at their annual convention.

“Teens told us parents really expected to keep track of them, and they are expected to answer the phone if the parent calls. In some cases, the parent might continue to call until the teen answers,” says Noelle LaVoie, a psychologist in Petaluma, Calif., whose private research firm conducts corporate and government studies.

The research included interviews of teenagers 15-18, who were in their first few years on the road, in 31 states.

Distracted driving is the leading cause crashes among drivers of all ages, according to a 2013 study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and is as dangerous as drunk driving. Distracted driving causes 11% of fatal car crashes involving teenagers, and 2,700 teens between 16 and 19 years old are killed every year because of the problem.

“One of the things teens talked about is the fact that parents used their cell phone while driving,” LaVoie says. “It was just very surprising to see how directly parents are involved … What we do know for sure is if parents would not call their teens while they’re (kids) driving, it would reduce teen distracted driving.”

Another distracted driving survey, presented on Thursday, August 7th, researchers asked college students about the things that caused their distracted driving the most – 89% answered that they placed cell phone calls while driving, while 79% texted while driving.

“Younger drivers seemed overconfident in their ability to multi-task,” says co-author Keli Braitman, an assistant professor of psychology at William Jewell College in Liberty, Mo.

“This is a very critical reminder of the importance parents play in making sure their teens are safe drivers,” said Jonathan Adkins, executive director of the Governors Highway Safety Association in Washington, D.C., who wasn’t involved in the research.

“The biggest [strategy] is through education with parents,” Adkins added. “They have to change the culture so it’s no longer acceptable for anyone to use their cellphone and drive. This is a wake-up call for good parenting.”

The Strom Law Firm Helps Those Injured by Distracted Drivers, Including Texting and Driving

If you have been injured by a distracted driver, the South Carolina accident attorneys at the Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. will fight for fair compensation for your injuries. Our South Carolina car accident lawyers are prepared to fight for compensation in the courtroom and will defend your right to compensation for your past and future medical bills, lost wages and future earnings, your pain and suffering, and, in the event of a fatal car accident, even wrongful death. Our attorneys offer free, confidential consultations to discuss the facts of your personal injury case for distracted driving, so contact us today. 803.252.4800.

Study Shows Texting and Driving Legislation Works

texting and driving

New Study Shows That Laws Work to Prevent Texting and Driving Accidents

texting and drivingA new research study published in the American Journal of Public Health shows that texting and driving legislation is the most effective means of preventing that type of distracted driving accident.

Texting and driving has surfaced as one of the leading causes of death among teenagers and young adults, higher even than drunk driving. The distracted driving practice also has as high a mortality rate for the general population as drunk driving, according to studies. South Carolina recently passed texting and driving legislation, making it the last Southern state to do so.

The latest research study, published in the August edition of the journal, analyzed traffic data over an 11 year period, and looked closely at traffic patterns and car accident data in which police officers specifically stopped drivers for texting and driving (called primary enforcement laws). The study also looked into the effectiveness of other texting and driving laws, which ban the practice but allow police to write tickets only if texting and driving also impacts other traffic laws.

Research showed that primary anti-texting and driving laws were the most effective, preventing an average of 20 vehicular accident deaths per state, per year.

Currently, 45 states ban texting and driving, with 39 of those using primary enforcement – more than the 33 that allow police to pull drivers over for not wearing a seat belt.

There are 3,300 fatalities related to distracted driving car accidents per year in the United States. The CDC reports that 31% of 18-64 year old drivers in the US admit to having sent a text while operating a vehicle in the past 30 days.

South Carolina’s Texting and Driving Law Officially In Effect As Of June 2014

On Monday, June 9th, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley signed the state’s texting and driving ban into law. The texting and driving ban went immediately into effect after Governor Haley signed it.

The ban covers writing or reading texts, emails, or social media sites while operating a vehicle. South Carolina is the 45th state to pass this legislation. Prior to the statewide ban, local municipalities took matters into their own hands. Greenville, Beaufort, and Charleston Counties all passed texting and driving legislation to protect their citizens.

The number of local governments banning texting and driving spurred the successful statewide ban. “At least we have an overall texting bill that makes the entire state exactly the same. The way it was, nobody knew what the texting law was when they drove from one county to the next,” said Rep. Don Bowen, R-Anderson, who’s fought for a statewide ban since 2010.

“In a state not well-known for regulating behind-the-wheel behavior, legislators are saying, ‘Your decisions behind the wheel have consequences for everyone because you endanger everyone else as well as yourself,’” said Tom Crosby, spokesman for AAA Carolinas. “It’s a great start.”

A “training period” of 180 days will go into effect once the texting and driving ban is signed into law, during which time police will issue warnings rather than tickets.

The Strom Law Firm Helps Those Injured by Distracted Drivers, Including Texting and Driving

If you have been injured by a distracted driver, the South Carolina accident attorneys at the Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. will fight for fair compensation for your injuries. Our South Carolina car accident lawyers are prepared to fight for compensation in the courtroom and will defend your right to compensation for your past and future medical bills, lost wages and future earnings, your pain and suffering, and, in the event of a fatal car accident, even wrongful death. Our attorneys offer free, confidential consultations to discuss the facts of your personal injury case for distracted driving, so contact us today. 803.252.4800.

Texting and Driving Ban Now in Effect in South Carolina

texting and driving ban

Texting and Driving Ban Should Result In Fewer Accidents in South Carolina

texting and driving banOn Monday, June 9th, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley signed the state’s texting and driving ban into law. The texting and driving ban went immediately into effect after Governor Haley signed it.

The ban covers writing or reading texts, emails, or social media sites while operating a vehicle. South Carolina is the 45th state to pass this legislation.  Frankly, it’s about time as distracted driving and  texting and driving cause more accidents than drinking and driving. Prior to the statewide ban, local municipalities took matters into their own hands. Greenville, Beaufort, and Charleston Counties all passed texting and driving legislation to protect their citizens. The number of local governments banning texting and driving spurred the successful statewide ban. “At least we have an overall texting bill that makes the entire state exactly the same. The way it was, nobody knew what the texting law was when they drove from one county to the next,” said Rep. Don Bowen, R-Anderson, who’s fought for a statewide ban since 2010. “In a state not well-known for regulating behind-the-wheel behavior, legislators are saying, ‘Your decisions behind the wheel have consequences for everyone because you endanger everyone else as well as yourself,'” said Tom Crosby, spokesman for AAA Carolinas. “It’s a great start.” A “training period” of 180 days will go into effect once the texting and driving ban is signed into law, during which time police will issue warnings rather than tickets.

The ban supersedes local ordinances, passed in 19 townships and cities across South Carolina, that regulate texting and driving differently from the statewide ban, including higher fines or points deducted from drivers’ licenses. Under the compromise texting and driving legislation, drivers who violate the law will not receive any penalty points on their licenses, but will face fines starting at $25, with the maximum penalty at $50. The use of GPS for navigation and texting emergency services in the event of an accident are permitted, according to the new law. Police officers would also be prohibited from confiscating or viewing drivers’ cellphones when they pulled someone over for texting and driving. “This texting and driving ban will save more lives than any other action by state government in years,” said Sen. Vincent Sheheen, D-Camden. Texting and driving studies in recent years have shown that texting and driving is just as dangerous as driving while intoxicated.

Distracted Driving, Including Texting and Driving, in South Carolina

Distracted driving includes:

  • talking on a cell phone
  • eating and drinking
  • talking to passengers
  • grooming or putting on makeup
  • reading books, newspapers, or even a map
  • using a PDA or navigation system
  • watching a video or playing on a computer or tablet
  • playing with the radio, a CD or an iPod
  • texting or writing emails
  • checking social media

It’s a common occurrence to see distracted driving while cruising down South Carolina roads and interstates.  Whether the distraction is eating, putting on makeup, talking on a cellphone, or even just daydreaming, the effects of distracted driving can lead to an accident, resulting in life altering and even deadly consequences.

The Strom Law Firm Helps Those Injured by Distracted Drivers, Including Texting and Driving

If you have been injured by a distracted driver, the South Carolina accident attorneys at the Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. will fight for fair compensation for your injuries. Our South Carolina car accident lawyers are prepared to fight for compensation in the courtroom and will defend your right to compensation for your past and future medical bills, lost wages and future earnings, your pain and suffering, and, in the event of a fatal car accident, even wrongful death. Our attorneys offer free, confidential consultations to discuss the facts of your personal injury case for distracted driving, so contact us today. 803.252.4800.

SC Lawmakers Pass Texting and Driving Ban

texting and driving

Texting and Driving Ban Passes House and Senate, Goes to Governor

texting and drivingAfter a long struggle and an 11th-hour compromise, South Carolina lawmakers have overwhelmingly passed a ban on texting and driving, making SC the 44th state to pass such legislation.

On Wednesday, June 4th, the House passed the texting and driving ban 94-2, while the Senate passed the new legislation 42-2. Under the compromise texting and driving legislation, drivers who violate the law would not receive any penalty points on their licenses, but would face fines starting at $25.  Texting and driving is dangerous and can result in an accident.

The use of GPS for navigation and texting emergency services in the event of an accident are permitted, according to the new law. Police officers would also be prohibited from confiscating or viewing drivers’ cellphones when they pulled someone over for texting and driving.

A “training period” of 180 days will go into effect once the texting and driving ban is signed into law, during which time police will issue warnings rather than tickets. The ban supersedes local ordinances, passed in 19 townships and cities across South Carolina, that regulate texting and driving differently from the statewide ban, including higher fines or points deducted from drivers’ licenses.

“The ban will help protect the people of South Carolina, clear up confusing and irregular local regulations and make our roads safer around the state,” Sen. Vincent Sheheen, D-Camden, said.

“Without a doubt, this is a great day for the lives of all drivers and passengers in South Carolina,” said Sen. Luke Rankin, R-Conway. “Finally we catch up with the rest of the country in acknowledging a white-and-black reality – texting while driving kills.”

Distracted Driving, Including Texting and Driving, in South Carolina

Distracted driving includes:

  • talking on a cell phone
  • eating and drinking
  • talking to passengers
  • grooming or putting on makeup
  • reading books, newspapers, or even a map
  • using a PDA or navigation system
  • watching a video or playing on a computer or tablet
  • playing with the radio, a CD or an iPod
  • texting or writing emails
  • checking social media

It’s a common occurrence to see distracted drivers cruising down South Carolina roads and interstates.  Whether the distraction is eating, putting on makeup, talking on a cellphone, or even just daydreaming, the effects of distracted driving can lead to an accident, resulting in life altering and even deadly consequences.

The Strom Law Firm Helps Those Injured by Distracted Drivers, Including Texting and Driving

If you have been injured by a distracted driver, the South Carolina accident attorneys at the Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. will fight for fair compensation for your injuries. Our South Carolina car accident lawyers are prepared to fight for compensation in the courtroom and will defend your right to compensation for your past and future medical bills, lost wages and future earnings, your pain and suffering, and, in the event of a fatal car accident, even wrongful death. Our attorneys offer free, confidential consultations to discuss the facts of your personal injury case for distracted driving, so contact us today. 803.252.4800.

Distracted Driving Is a Huge Problem in the US

distracted driving

As SC Schedules Debate about Texting and Driving, Stats on Distracted Driving Released

distracted drivingThe state of South Carolina is one of very few states remaining in the US that does not have a specific texting and driving ban, although other forms of distracted driving have penalties. The current proposed texting and driving ban must pass by Thursday, June 5th, if the state has any hope of regulating this new and deadly form of distracted driving.

A recent report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration showed that distracted driving is just as deadly as drunk driving. Statistics from 2010, the latest year with available data, showed that 17% of the economic cost of traffic accidents came from distracted driving, particularly texting and driving; in contrast, drunk driving had an 18% economic burden, while speeding was the costliest at 21% of the economic cost of all traffic accidents.  Distracted driving accidents can be prevented.

“Including lost quality of life, these crashes were responsible for $129 billion, or 15 percent of the overall societal harm caused by motor-vehicle crashes,” the report said.

In total, “the price tag for crashes comes at a heavy burden for Americans at $871 billion in economic loss and societal harm. This includes $277 billion in economic costs – nearly $900 for each person living in the United States based on calendar year 2010 data — and $594 billion in harm from the loss of life and the pain and decreased quality of life due to injuries,” the NHTSA said.

Despite these disturbing numbers, as well as local governments’ specific distracted driving legislation, South Carolina legislators cannot agree on what a texting and driving ban should look like for the entire state.

“We need continuity and uniformity across the cities and the counties,” said state Sen. Thomas Alexander, R-Oconee, a sponsor of the bill.

“We have a great chance of passing a statewide ban,” said Sen. Joel Lourie, D-Richland, a sponsor of the statewide ban, in spite of the fact that the Legislature is racing against its adjournment on June 5th.

Distracted Driving in South Carolina

Distracted driving includes:

  • talking on a cell phone
  • eating and drinking
  • talking to passengers
  • grooming or putting on makeup
  • reading books, newspapers, or even a map
  • using a PDA or navigation system
  • watching a video or playing on a computer or tablet
  • playing with the radio, a CD or an iPod

It’s a common occurrence to see distracted drivers cruising down South Carolina roads and interstates.  Whether the distraction is eating, putting on makeup, talking on a cellphone, or even just daydreaming, the effects of distracted driving can lead to an accident, resulting in life altering and even deadly consequences.

The Strom Law Firm Helps Those Injured by Distracted Drivers

If you have been injured by a distracted driver, the South Carolina accident attorneys at the Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. will fight for fair compensation for your injuries. Our South Carolina car accident lawyers are prepared to fight for compensation in the courtroom and will defend your right to compensation for your past and future medical bills, lost wages and future earnings, your pain and suffering, and, in the event of a fatal car accident, even wrongful death. Our attorneys offer free, confidential consultations to discuss the facts of your personal injury case for distracted driving, so contact us today. 803.252.4800.